AUSTRALIA’S EPIC STORY: Exploring 130,000 Years of History
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25 March 2018 SLQ Auditorium 1

Venue

SLQ Auditorium 1

Location

Stanley Place, South Brisbane, QLD, 4101, Australia

Session Times

Cost

Adult: $30 Concession: $25 Student: $10
Darren Curnoe
Moderator

Darren Curnoe

Moderator

Darren Curnoe

Darren Curnoe is a palaeoanthropologist, archaeologist, educator and science communicator. His research focusses on understanding human origins and ancient human ecology in Australasia, Southeast Asia and East Asia.

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Zenobia Jacobs
Participant

Zenobia Jacobs

Participant

Zenobia Jacobs

Professor Zenobia Jacobs is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow and Director of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating laboratory at the University of Wollongong. Her background and training...

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Richard Roberts
Participant

Richard Roberts

Participant

Richard Roberts

Distinguished Professor Richard ‘Bert’ Roberts is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Australian Laureate Fellow and Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH) at the...

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Lynette Russell
Participant

Lynette Russell

Participant

Lynette Russell

Professor Lynette Russell is a historian who combines anthropology and archaeology in her research. She is Director of the Monash Indigenous Studies Centre, which is a research and teaching unit...

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Summary

Now is the time to tell a culturally inclusive, globally significant environmental history of Australia. We like to call it, Australia’s Epic Story.

According to scientific research Aboriginal people have occupied Australia for at least 65,000 years. Understanding how they survived and indeed thrived across the millennia remains a huge challenge. Indigenous people in Australia have a unique relationship to the land and for many their history and culture is interwoven with, and connected to, the history of the continent which extends beyond these timelines.

Join our distinguished panel as they tackle head-on some ways in which bringing science, humanities and Indigenous knowledges together helps us develop a richer and more complete understanding of Australia’s past—and help shape views about the continent’s future.

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